• Show Review: Jeremy Scott Spring 2013

    Jeremy Scott has never been one to stray from controversy: you remember the whole shackle sneaker debacle. Well, he decided to stir up the fashion industry once again with his “Arab Spring” Spring 2013 collection. If you’ve been keeping up with your current events, then you know that the Arab Spring is a relatively recent movement, named for the wave of demonstrations and uprisings that started in December 2010 in Egypt, Libya, Yemen, and several other countries. With tensions still brewing, Scott’s theme was more than relevant, and the designs played on the topic in playful ways that might be construed as a tad offensive (no surprise there) with niqab-esque veils flowing from fitted caps to a cropped blouse covered in dozens of mini gold guns.

    Though most of the Middle East is characterized by rather modest dressing, Scott decided to touch upon the decadence and luxury of the rich and powerful in the region, which is one of the many underlying reasons for the start of the Arab Spring. Blue python print covered bandeau tops and knee-high boots while chain prints uplifted everything from mini skirts to men’s tracksuits.

    The animal prints continued with leopard, croc, gold metallic zebra, and giraffe.

    The collection really shined with the introduction of some of the offering’s sexier designs. Gold metallic bandeau and bra tops, sheer printed trousers, and a see-through sequin jersey dress on Sessilee Lopez were definitely some of the raciest looks, though not necessarily the most functional. Will anyone be bold enough to wear them? I can guess that Kat Graham and Nicki Minaj will take them for a spin.

    Jeremy Scott literally pushes boundaries for a living and his outlook is quite refreshing in an industry where many take themselves far too seriously. Only bone I have to pick with this collection is that the subject matter is so serious and touching upon it is such a statement that it almost seems as if he is making fun of the momentous events that have happened in the Middle East and their significance on the global stage. If he is going to be a designer that goes against the grain and addresses real life issues in his designs then I am all for that, but he will certainly come up against more scrutiny if he continues to play around with such sensitive topics.

    What do you think?

    Images: Style.com


    Faith Cummings is a senior editor and staff writer for Fashion Bomb Daily.

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